Crash Course

Jonathan and I were running errands last week and I had the radio turned to the local NPR station. I love listening to request Fridays, as I’m sure to hear lots of favorite classical pieces. This time was no exception, and before long, a Beethoven symphony started playing.  I was humming along, enjoying the familiar melody, when I looked over and saw that Jonathan had a totally blank look on his face.

“J, do you recognize this at all?”

“Nope.”

“It’s Beethoven.”

“Okay.”

“Can you believe he wrote music like this when he couldn’t hear?”

“Hunh..okay.”

Dude wouldn’t recognize Beethoven if he hit him over the head with a cello. I have totally failed my kids.

So, in a frantic attempt to make up for lost time, we’ve jumped into a crash course of composer immersion. This week is Bach week.  If you live in the area and use the central library, and need anything on Bach for the next month, please go and get it now. There may not be any left in another week or so.

I’m in a panic, people.

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5 responses to “Crash Course

  1. Lol! 🙂 I have been entirely unsystematic about music ed too, I’m completely embarrassed about it. I just bought the Vox Music Masters series “An Introduction to the Classics” and we’re going through it now. The recordings they use aren’t exactly world-class performances, but they are serviceable, the biographical information is a good intro, and they give a good idea of the style and sound of each composer.

  2. I can’t believe I missed this! You know they do have a good start on music appreciation and education from church. I’ll bet they would recognize some Beethoven and Bach from the hymns! I’m glad they’ll be learning, more, though!

  3. I’ve outsourced a big portion to Ann Rachlin and Classical Kids CDs. It seems to have worked, though, because they recognized a surprising number of the songs that people figure skated to during the Olympics. Oh, wait. Maybe piano lessons helped. In any case, I’ve done shockingly little on my own. I’m hoping to hit a few musicians in more detail when we get there in history–it might be a while though, because I’m having wonderful fun in the early middle ages where we did, at least, cover Gregorian chants.

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